Baby healthy foods | breast feeding | solid foods

BABY HEALTHY FOODS | BREASTFEEDING | SOLID FOODS

BABY HEALTHY FOODS | BREASTFEEDING | SOLID FOODS

BABY HEALTHY FOODS | BREASTFEEDING | SOLID FOODS.  For many years, scientists have been playing out the ingredients that make breast milk the perfect food for babies. They’ve discovered to day over 200 close compounds to fight infection, help the immune system mature, aid in digestion, and support brain growth nature-made properties that science simply cannot copy.

Baby healthy foods | breast feeding | solid foods

Reasons To Breast Feed

  • The important long-term benefits of breastfeeding include reduced risk of asthma, allergies, obesity, and some forms of childhood cancer. The more that
    scientists continue to learn, the better breast milk looks.
  • In addition to making your baby healthier, breastfeeding may also make him smarter.
  • Many studies have proved that breastfed babies tend to be smarter than babies who were fed with formula or other methods.
  • Breastfeeding does help with nutrients and the support of brain growth, which is something every mother should think about.

The benefits for the nursing mom are just as good as they are for the baby.

  • The hormones that are released during breastfeeding will curb blood loss post-delivery and help to shrink the uterus back to its normal size.
  • Long term, the breastfeeding mom will have a lower risk for premenopausal breast cancer, which is the kind that strikes before the age of 50.
  • The benefits will begin to show with three to six months of breastfeeding and increase the longer that breastfeeding continues.
  • By now, you should realize that breast milk is one power-packed liquid. It offers more for your baby than formula or any other scientific creation for that matter.
  • As you begin to plan for the future of your baby, commit to breastfeeding him for as long as you possibly can as it will do both your bodies good.

Getting Started With Breast Feeding

  • When you hold your baby for the first time in the delivery room, you should put his lips to your breast.
  • Although your mature milk hasn’t developed yet, your breasts are still producing a substance known as colostrum that helps to protect your baby from infections.
  • If your baby has trouble finding or staying on your nipple, you shouldn’t panic.

Breastfeeding is an art that will require a lot of patience and a lot of practice.

  • No one expects you to be an expert when you first start, so you shouldn’t hesitate to ask for advice or have a nurse show you what you need to do.
  • Once you start, keep in mind that nursing shouldn’t be painful.
  • When your baby latches on, pay attention to how your breasts feel.
  • If the latching on hurts, break the suction then try again.
  • You should nurse quite frequently, as the more you nurse the more quickly your mature milk will come in and the more milk you’ll produce.
  • Breastfeeding for 10 – 15 minutes per breast 8 – 10 times every 24 hours is an ideal target.

Crying is a sign of hunger, which means you should feed your baby before he starts crying.

  • During the first few days, you may have to wake your baby to begin breastfeeding, and he may end up falling asleep during feeding.
  • To ensure that your baby is eating often enough, you should wake him up if it has been four hours since the last time he has been fed.

Getting comfortable

  • Feedings can take 40 minutes or longer, therefore you’ll want a cozy spot.
  • You don’t want to be sitting somewhere where you will be bothered, as it can make the process very hard.

Breast Feeding And Positioning

  • For some people, the process of breastfeeding seems to come naturally, although there’s a level of skill required for successful feeding and a correct technique to use.
  • Incorrect positioning is one of the biggest reasons for unsuccessful feeding and it can even injure the nipple or breast quite easily.
  • By stroking the baby’s cheek with the nipple, the baby will open its mouth towards the nipple, which should then be pushed in so that the baby will get a mouthful of nipple and areola.
  • This position is known as latching on.
  • A lot of women prefer to wear a nursing bra to allow easier access to the breast than other normal bras.
  • The length of feeding time will vary.
  • Regardless of the duration of feeding time, mothers need to be comfortable.

The following are positions you can use:

  • 1. Upright – The sitting position where the back is straight.
  • 2. Mobile – Mobile is where the mother carries her baby in a sling or carrier while breastfeeding.
  • Doing this allows the mother to breastfeed in the work of everyday life.
  • 3. Lying down – This is good for night feeds or for those who have had a cesarean section.
  • 4. On her back – The mother is sitting slightly upright, also a useful position for tandem breastfeeding.
  • 5. On her side – The mother and baby both lie on their sides.
  • 6. Hands and knees – In this feeding position, the mother is on all fours with the baby underneath her.

Keep in mind, this position isn’t normally recommended.

  • Anytime you don’t feel comfortable with a feeding position, always stop and switch to a different position.
  • Each position is different, while some mothers prefer one position, others may like a different position.
  • All you need to do is an experiment and see which position is best for you.

Your Nursing Area

  • Once you’ve reached the third trimester, you’ll probably start stocking up on nursing bras, breast pads, and loose button-down shirts for the coming months ahead.
  • While getting ready to breastfeed, you can also create your area, a custom-designed breastfeeding area for yourself.

Your nursing area should reflect your personality.

  • If you like a loud, yet friendly surrounding, you should consider setting in a corner of the living room or family room.
  • Keep an extra chair or two near you so family members or even friends can keep you company.
  • If you prefer peace, a cozy study or empty guest room would be ideal.
  • You can close the door, dim the lights down, then take a few deep, calming breaths while you breastfeed.

Your chair

  • No matter if it’s a glider, overstuffed recliner, or desk chair with wheels, you should make sure your nursing chair is very comfortable.
  • You’ll be sitting in the chair for hours each day, so you’ll want it to be very comfortable.
  • You should always look for one that offers back and shoulder support, along with armrests.

Support underfoot

  • You can use a footstool, low coffee table, or a stack of pillows to elevate your feet as you breastfeed.
  • If you raise your legs and feet to bring your baby to your breast, you’ll avoid possible backache.

Pillows and more pillows

  • Your neck, arms, feet, and back will need as much support as you can give, so don’t hesitate to surround your body with pillows.
  • If you lay a pillow across your lap for your baby to lay on, he’ll be very comfortable and that much is closer to your nipple.
  • For extra comfort, you can even purchase a specially made nursing pillow that will encircle your waist.

Table for one

  • You should always keep a small table or stand within arm’s length of your breastfeeding chair.
  • What you use should be big enough to hold a coaster and glass of liquid.
  • Some women prefer to drink through a straw, while others prefer to drink from glass.
  • You’ll also want to keep healthy snacks on hand as well, such as fresh fruit, nuts, crackers, and peanut butter to help you replace the energy you use while you breastfeed.

Distractions

  • If your baby is a slow eater or has a really big appetite, you may want to keep yourself busy while he feeds.
  • You can fill the shelves of a nearby cupboard or bookcase with your favorite books or crossword puzzles to occupy yourself until your baby is full.
  • You should also keep a phone nearby as well so that you can talk to family or friends to pass the time.
Baby healthy foods | breast feeding | solid foods

Health And Diet

  • The nutritional requirements for the baby will rely solely on breast milk, and therefore the mother will need to maintain a healthy diet.
  • If the baby is large and grows fast, the fat stores gained by the mother during pregnancy can be depleted quickly, meaning that she may have trouble eating good enough to maintain and develop sufficient amounts of milk.

This type of diet normally involves a high-calorie, high nutrition diet which follows on from that in pregnancy.

  • Even though mothers in famine conditions can produce milk with nutritional content, a mother that is malnourished may produce milk with lacking levels of vitamins A, D, B6, and B12.
  • If they smoke, breastfeeding mothers must use extreme caution.
  • More than 20 cigarettes a day has been shown to reduce the milk supply and cause vomiting, diarrhea, rapid heart rate, and restlessness in infants.
  • SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome) is more common in babies that are exposed to smoke.

Heavy drinking is also known to harm the infant, as well as yourself.

  • If you are breastfeeding, you should avoid alcohol or consume very small amounts at a time.
  • The excessive consumption of alcohol by the mother can result in irritability, sleeplessness, and increased feeding in the infant. Moderate use, normally 1 – 2 cups a day produces no effect.
  • Therefore, mothers that are breastfeeding are advised to avoid caffeine or restrict their intake of it.
  • By following a healthy diet and limiting your intake of the above, you’ll ensure that your baby gets the right nutrients during your time of breastfeeding.
  • This stage of life is very important as you don’t want anything to happen to your baby.
Baby healthy foods | breast feeding | solid foods

Starting Solid Foods

  • Breast milk is all your baby will need until at least 4 months of age.
  • There does come a time when breast milk will no longer supply all of your baby’s nutrition needs.
  • Full-term babies will start to require iron from other sources by 6 – 9 months of age.
  • Some babies that aren’t started on solid foods by the age of 9 – 12 months may have a great level of difficulty accepting solid foods.
  • It’s a developmental milestone when your child starts solid foods – as he is now growing up.

When to start

  • The ideal time to begin solid foods is when the baby shows interest in starting.
  • Some babies will show interest in solid food when it’s on their parents’ plates, as early as 4 months of age.
  • By 5 – 6 months, most babies will reach out and try to grab the food.

When the baby starts to reach for food, it’s normally the time to go ahead and give him some.

  • Sometimes, it may be a better idea to start food earlier.
  • When a baby seems to get hungry or once weight gain isn’t continuing at the desired rate, it may be good to start solid foods as early as 3 months.
  • It may be possible, however, to continue breastfeeding alone and have the baby less hungry or growing more rapidly.
  • Breast-fed babies will digest solid foods better and earlier than artificially fed babies because breast milk will contain enzymes that help to digest fats, proteins, and starch.
  • Breast-fed babies will also have had a variety of different tastes in their life since the flavors of many foods the mother eats will pass into her milk.

Introducing solid foods

  • When the baby begins to take solid foods at the age of 5 – 6 months, there is very little difference between what he starts will or what order it is introduced.
  • You should, however, avoid spicy foods or highly allergenic foods at first, although if your baby reaches for the potato on your plate, you should let him have it if it isn’t too hot.
  • Offer your baby the foods that he seems to be interested in.
  • Allow your baby to enjoy the food and don’t worry too much about how much he takes at first, as much of it may end up on the floor or in his hair anyhow.
  • The easiest way to get iron for your baby at 5 – 6 months of age is by giving him meat.
  • Cereal for infants has iron, although it is poorly absorbed and may cause your baby to get constipated.

Avoiding Foods While Breast Feeding

  • Many women find that they can eat whatever they may like during breastfeeding.
  • Even though it’s true that some strongly favored foods can change the taste of your milk, many babies seem to enjoy the varieties of breast milk flavors.

Occasionally, your baby may get cranky at the breast after you eat certain foods.

  • If you notice this happening, simply avoid that particular food.
  • The most common offenders doing breastfeeding include chocolate, spices, citrus fruits, garlic, chili, lime, gassy vegetables, and fruits with laxative type effects, such as prunes and cherries.
  • You can have a cup or two of coffee a day, although too much caffeine can interfere with your baby’s sleep and even make him or her cranky.

Keep in mind, caffeine is found in many sodas, tea, and even over-the-counter type medicine as well.

  • It’s okay to have an alcoholic beverage now and then, although having more than one drink can increase your blood alcohol level, putting the alcohol into your breast milk.
  • If you are planning to have more than one drink at a time, it’s best to wait two hours or more per drink before you resume any type of nursing or breastfeeding.

There is no need to pump and dump unless your breasts are full and it’s time to feed your baby.

  • While breastfeeding, any type of heavy drinking should be avoided.
  • Before you omit any foods from your diet, you should talk to your doctor.
  • If you avoid certain foods and it causes a nutritional imbalance, you may need to see a nutritionist for advice on taking other foods or getting nutritional supplements.

Make Your Own Baby Food The Easy Way

  • Is your baby about to start solid foods?
  • Are you thinking of making your baby food?
  • When you make a baby’s first foods, you can save money and reduce waste.
  • You also can choose more nutritious options. Fresh foods are typically more nutritious than canned, and you can purchase organic food to prepare for the baby if you wish.
  • You can also avoid unwholesome ingredients that show up in commercial baby food.
  • Making baby food doesn’t have to be expensive or time-consuming. The easiest and cheapest way is the best way!

The easy way to make your baby food:

1) Don’t bother with buying one of those baby food grinders.

  • They’re hard to clean and have too much hassle.

2) If you wait until your baby is 6 months old to start solids, you can almost always just mash with a fork to the desired consistency.

  • If you’re breastfeeding, you can even wait until baby’s “pincer grasp” is developed and offer him small finger foods like peas, bits of grated apple, and the like.
  • The pincer grasp is developed when the baby can pinch small objects (like those bits of carpet fluff or food on the kitchen floor!) in between his thumb and first finger.
  • If you have a family tendency towards food allergy, waiting longer to start solids may be preferable. No matter what baby’s age, always offer one food at a time and wait several days to watch for signs of allergy before offering another. Take it slow.

3) Start with fresh single ingredient foods like:

  • Banana
  • Steamed carrot, turnip, potato, yam
  • Avocado
  • Ripe pear, peach, melon, plum
  • Cooked squash
  • Grated apple- raw or steamed
  • Peas
  • Well cooked beans
  • Hard-cooked egg yolks (avoid the whites until 1 year)
  • Some of these foods could be served raw.
  • Others are lightly steamed (steaming retains more nutrients than canning), to make them softer for the baby.

4) It’s not necessary to make a big deal of preparing baby’s food.

  • If you want to take a lot of time blending food and freezing them in ice cube trays, you could certainly do that.
  • But I’m all for the easy approach!
  • Although you do want to avoid giving baby salt and sugar (and spices that may upset the tummy), you can usually just take an ingredient from your menu and “make” the baby’s dinner.
  • For instance, if you’re steaming veggies to serve at dinner, take a tablespoon of them out of the pan before you add butter and salt.

Put this on the baby’s plate and mash away. Voila!

  • Instant baby food with no extra work. Or take a bit of beef from your roast and mash mash mash until it’s very soft.
  • Even when you’re at a restaurant, you can either bring an apple with you and “grate” it finely with a spoon at your table, or bring along a banana or other portable food.
  • Any restaurant with a salad bar would have cooked beans or avocado. Or give baby a bit of your baked potato (before you add the goodies on top).
  • Life with a new baby is challenging enough.

Keep starting solids simple!

  • When you hold your baby for the first time in the delivery room, you should put his lips to your breast. Although your mature milk hasn’t developed yet, your breasts are still producing a substance known as colostrum that helps to protect your baby from infections. If your baby has trouble finding or staying on your nipple, you shouldn’t panic.

Breastfeeding is an art that will require a lot of patience and a lot of practice.

  • No one expects you to be an expert when you first start, so you shouldn’t hesitate to ask for advice or have a nurse show you what you need to do.
  • Once you start, keep in mind that nursing shouldn’t be painful.
  • When your baby latches on, pay attention to how your breasts feel.
  • If the latching on hurts, break the suction then try again.
  • You should nurse quite frequently, as the more you nurse the more quickly your mature milk will come in and the more milk you’ll produce.

Breastfeeding for 10 – 15 minutes per breast 8 – 10 times every 24 hours is an ideal target.

  • Crying is a sign of hunger, which means you should feed your baby before he starts crying.
  • During the first few days, you may have to wake your baby to begin breastfeeding, and he may end up falling asleep during feeding.
  • To ensure that your baby is eating often enough, you should wake him up if it has been four hours since the last time he has been fed.

Getting comfortable

  • Feedings can take 40 minutes or longer, therefore you’ll want a cozy spot.
  • You don’t want to be sitting somewhere where you will be bothered, as it can make the process very hard.

Health Tips For Your Baby

Nutrition And Fitness During Pregnancy-Part 3

https://youtu.be/TapeBriMc8s

https://youtu.be/HkZRiBglK4U

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